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  • torque by manual rotation

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by zubair, Jun 11, 2012.

    1. SCIYER

      SCIYER Well-Known Member

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      For the purpose of design you may consider a force of 2 kg applied by human hand. This force takes fatigue into consideration. Else, Human hand can apply a 10 kg force too.
       
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    3. gjpeters

      gjpeters Member

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      It is out of shear frustration that I am replying to this post. If you interested as to why please see my comments below but first:

      For ergonomic factors such as this the Roymech website recommended by RogersD is good for general information and is a good start point. When things get more complicated it is best to start looking into Human Engineering. There are some good university studies available if you do some smart searches on the Internet, I won't list the ones I've found so far as I don't know how public they are supposed to be. I do have one specific recommendation for this issue and that is a military standard available to the public MIL-STD-1472 it is http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-STD/MIL-STD-1400-1499/MIL-STD-1472G_39997/. The specific area is 5.1.4 but you should read around this as it can give you some good starting points for various future projects. Failing all that a simple Google for "wrist twisting strength" does throw up some interesting pdf files.

      I hope this helps.

      Now to my frustrations, please note I'm not trying to attack anyone specifically I am just asking people to be more considered in their response when they present themselves:
      - The brief was vague (this is definitely not my major frustration and I believe I've given a broad document suggestion to address the many unknown factors)
      - Replies saying the brief is too vague and not helping or not being specific about what else is required for the replier to help later.
      - It is inferred that that original question relates to the strength capability of the radial ulna joint and torque is specifically requested yet people keep talking in Newtons and not units of torque.
      - Kilogram is a measurement of mass.

      That is all.
       
    4. SCIYER

      SCIYER Well-Known Member

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      Thanks for pointing it out. The misnomer is more due the various units of measurements that I went through. My technician in the early days used Inches, thau (called locally as soodh). Then MKS system in college (where force is Kgf) [Loosely called as X Kg force or a force of X Kg] and am struggling to understand the SI units. It is rather confusing :confused:for me when interacting with freshers in my company who are from SI units through and through.
      Thanks once again.
       
    5. vimal15

      vimal15 New Member

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      force a human can apply while cranking



      have you got what you were looking for because I am also looking for the same thing . Average force a person can apply during cranking using lever. so if you have found out tell me. It will be useful for my project
       
    6. ARTHUR EGYIR FRANCIS

      ARTHUR EGYIR FRANCIS New Member

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      Please boss, can I get the edition and the page number of the Robert Norton's book which says the human force can provide force up to 60 lbf? Thank you.
       

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