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  • upward force cable

    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by jeroeney, Oct 8, 2015.

    1. jeroeney

      jeroeney New Member

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      Dear all

      I hope one of you can anwser the following. If you have a cable going over 3 rollers and making a S form. The 2 rollers at the bottem wont move the roller at the top depends on the design. what will be the maximum upward force when putting tension on hte cable ? is it the same as the maximum strenght of the cable ? I need to know this to design the frame of the top roller see sketch below.
      kind regards[​IMG]
       
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    3. CPPMable

      CPPMable Well-Known Member

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      No, it would not be equal to the tension. If you are considering a true cable a cable can not support a moment in that axial plane like that. If you have a point load as you do in your case you would have a triangular cable reaction to the point load. Try drawing it like that. The tension would be the hypotenuse force than if you know the roller deflection below the horizontal plane can do some trig to calculate the upward force. I believe this works out and seems to make sense to me at least.
       
    4. tonycro

      tonycro Well-Known Member

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      the maximum strength of the cable is a material property and is the point at which the pressure within the cable exceeds its elastic capacity.

      if the ends of the cable are fixed and the top roller applies a force as shown then the reaction at either end of the cable ought to be equal to the applied load - can you treat a cable as a simple beam would be my question.

      tony
       

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