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  • What follows is an off-the-wall idea

    Discussion in 'The Leisure Lounge' started by Justcurioustwo, Nov 9, 2019.

    1. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      A. That has nothing to do with the rest of this thread
      B. Unless you're mining it (probably in space) hydrogen is not a fuel source. It's a storage solution. You'll always spend more energy on the hydrolysis than you can get out of combusting the hydrogen
       
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    3. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Active Member

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      Wind, solar, wave are all energy providers but they have one flaw, the energy they can produce is not constant. When the wind stops blowing or the sea is calm, or the sky is covered in clouds the energy source stops. And in some cases, the energy output is not needed at that moment in time so the energy potential is wasted.

      What is needed is a battery to store the excess energy.

      I think that storing this excess energy through elastolysis, storing the hydrogen is the best storage medium right now. Sure there will be loses in the process but even then saving some energy is better than none at all.
       
    4. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Wonderful. There already exist technologies using this premise.
      What does your balloon wheel add to the equation?
       
    5. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Active Member

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      It is just a new look at an old principle.

      Within 10 years cars will not be running on fossil fuels. Most of the world knows this and are switching to renewables. All these renewables convert these energy sources to “electricity”.

      Fuel cells will be the new “battery” source that will power the next generation vehicles.

      America is way behind the curve. We need to catch up; NOW

      Hydrogen fuel cell

      A fuel cell is an electrochemical cell that converts the chemical energy of a fuel (often hydrogen) and an oxidizing agent (often oxygen[1]) into electricity through a pair of redox reactions.[2] Fuel cells are different from most batteries in requiring a continuous source of fuel and oxygen (usually from air) to sustain the chemical reaction, whereas in a battery the chemical energy usually comes from metals and their ions or oxides[3] that are commonly already present in the battery, except in flow batteries. Fuel cells can produce electricity continuously for as long as fuel and oxygen are supplied.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_cell

      Wind, solar, wave are all energy providers but the have one flaw, the energy they can produce is not constant. When the wind stops blowing or the sea is calm, or the sky is covered in clouds the energy source stops. And in some cases, the energy output is not needed at that moment in time so the energy potential is wasted.

      What is needed is a battery to store the excess energy.

      Clarity Fuel Cell car

      https://global.honda/innovation/FuelCell.html

      Riversimple has been very involved in the zero-emission conversation, from award nominations to media coverage, new events and podcasts. As concern about the climate crisis escalates, people are seeking alternatives to the status quo – and that definitely includes clean personal transport.

      https://www.riversimple.com/the-blog/
       
    6. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      10 years might be a bit optimistic, but agreed overall. I've come around to the idea of fuel cells a few years back, though whether they will ultimately beat out other portable storage solutions is still an open question.

      I'm not sure America is behind the curve. There are fuel cell companies in the States, and integrating them into cars will likely not be that big a deal. They're probably actually a much simpler retrofit to an internal combustion vehicle, as compared to chemical batteries.

      On a related topic, Parker actually has a really cool hydraulic accumulator hybrid engine for use in heavy vehicles that stop often, like garbage trucks. I really like it!

      I'm still not sure what this has to do with your initial post, but let's agree to agree at this point :)
       
    7. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Active Member

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      Have a Great New Year!!!!
       
    8. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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    9. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Active Member

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      Wrong, you give the ball a kick then another kick and another kick which "adds up" to a lot of kicks, not just one
       
    10. s.weinberg

      s.weinberg Well-Known Member EngineeringClicks Expert

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      Well, if you want to be pedantic, it's exactly like the following:

      I give a ball a bunch of progressive taps, then I give it one more:

      1. The kinetic energy from one tap is Y
      2. The kinetic energy, looking at it after a few taps is Y+Y+Y+Y+Y, as I give it one more tap

      Which is a greater kinetic energy than Y (yes/no)
       
    11. Justcurioustwo

      Justcurioustwo Active Member

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      You continue to miss the point. This has nothing to do with repeatedly kicking a ball. The diagram below speaks for itself.
      seaengine14.jpg

      On the right side there are several balloons lifting "together" while it only takes the energy to fill one balloon to maintain the system. This is the multiplying effect.
      :)-
       

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