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    Discussion in 'The main mechanical design forum' started by Outofmydepth, Oct 17, 2010.

    1. GarethW

      GarethW Chief Clicker Staff Member

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      Guys - I've disabled the "quick reply" feature. Hopefully you shouldn't have any more problems. Please let me know here if anything else gives you a problem :)
       
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    3. Outofmydepth

      Outofmydepth Active Member

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      Hello again,

      I understand the stress element of extending the shaft. There is no easy solution. If I risk the extended shaft and damage the bearing on the motor I will be looking for another scrap washing machine. If I run the chain near to the polyvee belt I have to devise a means of stopping the belt becoming soaked in oil.

      With regard to running a sprocket off the motor. I am planning to weld a piece of threaded rod or large bolt, M16 or M18 onto the end of the 24mm metal pulley. The pulley seems to be pressed onto a stainless steel shaft. The pulley is dark blue. What material do you expect the pulley to be made out of and will I be able to weld to it?.

      Thanks

      Outofmydepth
       
    4. spiceage

      spiceage Member

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      Despite Gareth disabling the Quickreply, the system lost my last reply to you yet gain. Is there a timeout on the login I wonder?

      Anyway to quickly recap, normal steel is magnetic, ally is not and many stainless steels (but not all) are non magnetic. If it's ally, it's probably glued on the shaft with high strength adhesive which can normally be destroyed with modest heat (so can bearings!) so be careful. If it's steel you may be able to weld without removing the pulley? If it's ally, you may be able to drill and tap three small holes which you can use to attach the sprocket via the shortest spacer you think you can get away with from an oil contamination point of view. Good luck.
       
    5. Outofmydepth

      Outofmydepth Active Member

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      Thank you spiceage,

      Understood.

      Ref keeping oil off the belt. I am considering including a metal disc say about the size of Alan Partridges dinner plate between the pulley and the sprocket. This will revolve with the pulley & sprocket and provide an effective screen between the 2.

      Outofmydepth
       
    6. Lloyd

      Lloyd Member

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      Rocol made/used to make an 'open gear spray'

      this was very 'sticky' thus resisted being lung off revoving parts.

      They also make/made a chain spray lubricant

      could be worth investigating?
       
    7. Outofmydepth

      Outofmydepth Active Member

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      Thanks Lloyd,

      Anyone any suggestions for bearings?

      I had decided to use some bearings that had come off some bikes (between the pedals) but have had second thoughts.

      I will be using M20 threaded rod for the shaft, it makes it easy for me to fit the propeller and the bike cogs. I did think of just letting the threaded rod revolve within a piece of tube and keep it well oiled but doubt whether this will stand the test of time.

      I have now realised I can buy a pair of UCP205 pillar blocks off ebay pretty cheaply. Available in a range of sizes, 25mm or 1 inch might suit me best. I am hoping to find a piece of tubing that will fit over the threaded rod and inside the bearing. This threaded rod would be secured in place with a locking nut at each end. I assume M20 threaded rod will push into some 20mm id tube? so some 25mm od tube with a 2mm wall thickness should be perfect for the 25mm bearing???.

      The next thing I am wondering about is the propeller will create thrust. I am not sure whether the tubing will be secured in the pillar bearing or whether I will need to provide other means of stopping the shaft moving laterally?

      Outofmydepth
       
    8. Outofmydepth

      Outofmydepth Active Member

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      Just before anyone spots it.

      The 25mm will need to have a 2.5mm wall thickness to be 20mm ID.

      Outofmydepth
       
    9. spiceage

      spiceage Member

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      Hi again. The thrust from the propeller will need to be taken through the bearings and you must cater for axial forces in both directions. Deep groove ball bearings do this well and can be purchased with prepacked grease (known as either grease shielded or grease sealed types). If your pillow blocks take or already have ball bearings and if one of them is capable of axially restraining the ball bearing (some pillows deliberately allow the bearing to slide through to eliminate axial loading), then you should be OK.

      Keep the propellor as close as you can to the bearing - even a 20mm diameter steel shaft can look pretty flexible when supporting a high inertia with perhaps a rather unrefined balance! I would be inclined to bolster your studding with the steel tubing over as much of its length as possible.
       
    10. Outofmydepth

      Outofmydepth Active Member

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      Thanks spiceage,

      Just to let you know my project is still very much alive.

      At the moment I am concentrating my efforts on getting the stud welded onto the pulley on the motor. If this cannot be achieved successfully there is no point continuing. I have posted on the welding forum asking for advice.
      I have put some thought into welding the stud on without damaging the bearings and have decided it is possible to submerge the motor in a bucket of water up to the bearings. This will leave the pulley about 2 inches clear of the water and accessible for welding. The bearing submerged in water will be kept cool. Do you envisage any problems with this plan?

      Outofmydepth
       

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